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Articles

BIU JI: Ving Tsun's Misunderstood Form

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The following article was first written in 1989 and was previously published within the pages of ‘Combat’ magazine (Vol.15/No.5) in the April 1989 issue as ‘BIU JI: Wing Chun’s Misunderstood Form’. It is reproduced here in an updated and expanded format - the Author. 

 BIU JI: Ving Tsun’s Misunderstood Form

 

by David Peterson

Of the three ving tsun “empty-hand” forms, the third one, Biu Ji, is the most misunderstood. It has been touted as a “deadly” form with which one can become invincible in combat. It has been said to have been so treasured by the ving tsun clan that it was rarely seen and never taught to “outsiders.” The ‘Biu Ji’ form has also been said to contain the secrets of dim mak, the so-called “delayed death touch” with which one can dispose of their enemy with one touch, depending, of course, on the time of day, and so on.

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'Muk Yan Jong'

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- this article was previously published in the USA-based 'Masters' magazine (Spring 2010 issue) 

'Muk Yan Jong' - Wing Chun’s Wooden Warrior

by David Peterson

 

Whilst not unique to the Wing Chun system, the ‘Muk Yan Jong’ or “wooden man pile” is an important component of this famous southern Chinese martial art. The construction of “wooden dummies” in other Chinese systems may vary in shape, number and length of arms, and a range of other aspects, but it is generally agreed that the idea of training upon such apparatus was first developed in the famed Shaolin Temple in Henan, China. According to legend, a Wooden Man Alley existed in the temple and part of the graduation process of the monks there consisted of them fighting their way through this sophisticated training area. Over the years, other systems came up with their own variations on this fascinating training device.

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WONG SHUN LEUNG: Wing Chun Personified

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The following article was previously published within the pages of “Inside Kung-Fu” magazine (Vol.18/No.2) as ‘Wong Shun Leung: Wing Chun’s Living Legend’. It is reproduced here in its original form as a tribute to Sifu Wong, who passed away on January 28th 1997 - the Author. 

WONG SHUN LEUNG: Wing Chun Personified 

Trained by the late grandmaster Yip Man, teacher to the great Bruce Lee, Wong Shun Leung is perhaps best-known as the wing chun man who routinely challenged anyone of any style¾and lived to tell about it. 

by David Peterson

 

Hong Kong-based Wing Chun instructor, Wong Shun Leung, has been called many things by people in the martial arts world. England's 'Fighters' magazine called him, "...a communicator and teacher of Wing Chun par excellence"; Jesse Glover, the first American student of the late Bruce Lee, wrote in his book 'Bruce Lee's Non-Classical Gung Fu' that Wong Shun Leung "...is one of the greatest Wing Chun teachers in the world"; Bey Logan, editor of the British martial arts magazine 'Combat' wrote that "...Wong Shun Leung is far more important as a Wing Chun teacher in his own right than just a figure in the life of Bruce Lee. He deserves better than to be in anyone's shadow"; America's 'Black Belt' magazine simply called him "...a Wing Chun phenomenon."

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